Tampa-Area Businessman, Lance Ringhaver Died in Truck Crash

In 2015, 4,067 people were killed in large truck crashes in the United States

Tampa-Area Businessman, Lance Ringhaver Died in Truck Crash

On April 4, 2016, at approximately 8:35 p.m., Lance C. Ringhaver was driving an Infinity Q705 south in the center lane on U.S. Highway 41 in Apollo Beach when it came upon a tractor-trailer, blocking the roadway. The truck driver attempted to make a left turn north of U.S. Highway 41, but failed to make a complete turn when Ringhaver crashed into the tractor trailer truck and his car was wedged underneath.  Mr. Ringhaver died at the scene.

The truck driver, identified as Isbel Perez Guzman was not injured, but was cited for failing to yield the right of way.

Trucks with weak underride guards, or none at all, offer little to no protection for motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians who can possibly crash into the sides or rear of a truck and trailer. Rear underride guards are required on many trucks and trailers, but the standard is antiquated and ineffective in preventing underride crashes from becoming injurious or fatal. Overall, more than 4,000 people are killed in truck crashes every year in the United States and a portion of the preventable fatal crashes involve underride.

To find more information please visit our Underride Initiative page or send an email to info@trucksafety.org.

                                                              WE ARE HERE TO HELP

21 Years Old Woman Died in Middlesex County Truck Crash

On April 3, 2016, in the middle of the afternoon, Jacqueline Sanchez, 21, was driving a Toyota Camry southbound on the New Jersey, Woodbridge Turnpike when she crashed into the back of a disabled tractor trailer truck that was stopped in the right-hand lane. Sanchez was pronounced dead at the scene.

New Jersey State Trooper, Lawrence Peebles confirmed that the tractor trailer truck was not pulled over off the road and remained in the far right traveling lane. It is not clear why the truck did not pull off the road entirely.  The truck driver was not injured and the crash is under investigation by the New Jersey State Police.

Trucks with weak underride guards, or none at all, offer little to no protection for motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians who can possibly crash into the sides or rear of a truck and trailer. Rear underride guards are required on many trucks and trailers, but the standard is antiquated and ineffective in preventing underride crashes from becoming injurious or fatal. Overall, more than 4,000 people are killed in truck crashes every year in the United States and a portion of the preventable fatal crashes involve underride.

To find more information please visit our Underride Initiative page or send an email to info@trucksafety.org  

                                                            WE ARE HERE TO HELP

Truck Underride Roundtable

When: Thursday, May 5, 2016 (9:00 AM to 3:00 PM)

Where: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Vehicle Research Center in Ruckersville, VA

Please join us as researchers, government officials and industry leaders gather to discuss truck underride crashes and how to reduce the risks for passenger vehicle occupants. We will explore the scope of the problem and how regulation and voluntary action can help address it. In a crash test, IIHS researchers will demonstrate how underride protection has already improved. The full agenda and additional details will follow in the coming weeks.

Please RSVP to Chamelle Matthew at cmatthew@iihs.org or 703.247.1530

HOTEL INFORMATION

Rooms have been reserved for the night of May 4, 2016, at these Charlottesville hotels:

Omni – IIHS room rate:  $199

Cut-off date to make reservation:  Sunday, March 20, 2016;

located at 212 Ridge McIntire Rd, Charlottesville, VA 22903.

Hyatt Place – IIHS room rate: $109

Cut-off date to make reservation:  Wednesday, April 20, 2016;

located at 2100 Bond Street, Charlottesville, Virginia, 22901.

The roundtable is being organized and sponsored by

IIHS, the Truck Safety Coalition and Annaleah & Mary for Truck Safety

J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc. Orders 4,000 Trailers with New Rear Impact Guard Design

J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc., (NASDAQ:JBHT) one of the largest transportation logistics companies in North America, announced today that it recently ordered 4,000 Wabash National DuraPlate® dry van trailers that include the new RIG-16 Rear Underride Guard System. This new rear impact guard is engineered to prevent underride in multiple offset, or overlap, impact scenarios. The guard reduces the risk of injury or death for individuals involved in an accident with the rear of a trailer.

“At J.B. Hunt, we value safety above all else,” said John Roberts, President and Chief Executive Officer of J.B. Hunt Transport, Inc. “We applaud Wabash National’s leadership and advancements in rear impact protection, and we’re proud to be the first fleet to specify the new rear impact guard design.”

The rear impact guard is made of advanced, high-strength steel. It includes two additional vertical posts and a longer, reinforced bumper tube. This design will better absorb the impact should any part of the bumper become engaged in a collision. Additionally, the guard is formulated to resist corrosion.

The Truck Safety Coalition commends companies that take a proactive approach to promoting safety through smart purchasing decisions. Truck Safety Coalition volunteer and underride advocate Nancy Mueleners said, “I am glad that J.B. Hunt is equipping their trailers with an improved rear guard. Introductions of rear guards using new engineering approaches are a much-needed safety improvement that will prevent injuries and save lives.”

Production of units specifically for J.B. Hunt began in January. Wabash National formally unveiled this new technology at the American Trucking Associations’ Technology and Maintenance Council annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee last month.

About J.B. Hunt
J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc., a Fortune 500 and S&P 500 Company, focuses on providing safe and reliable transportation services to a diverse group of customers throughout the contiguous United States, Canada and Mexico. Utilizing an integrated, multimodal approach, the company provides capacity-oriented solutions centered on delivering customer value and industry-leading service. J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc. stock trades on NASDAQ under the ticker symbol JBHT and is a component of the Dow Jones Transportation Average. J.B. Hunt Transport, Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of JBHT. For more information, visit www.jbhunt.com.

Link to Article: http://www.reuters.com/article/ar-jb-hunt-transport-idUSnBw255195a+100+BSW20160325

Rulemaking to Improve Rear Impact Guards and Protections

This NPRM proposes to upgrade Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 223, “Rear impact guards,” and FMVSS No. 224, “Rear impact protection,” which together address rear underride protection in crashes into trailers and semitrailers. NHTSA is proposing to adopt requirements of the Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (CMVSS) for underride guards (CMVSS No. 223, “Rear impact guards,”) that became effective in 2007. The CMVSS No. 223 requirements are intended to provide rear impact guards with sufficient strength and energy absorption capability to protect occupants of compact and subcompact passenger cars impacting the rear of trailers at 56 km/h (35 mph). As the current requirements in FMVSS Nos. 223 and 224 were developed with the intent of providing underride crash protection to occupants of compact and subcompact passenger cars in impacts up to 48 km/h (30 mph) into the rear of trailers, increasing the robustness of the trailer/guard design such that it will be able to withstand crash velocities up to 56 km/h (35 mph) represents a substantial increase in the stringency of FMVSS Nos. 223 and 224.

This NPRM also proposes to adopt Transport Canada’s definition of “rear extremity” to define where on a trailer aerodynamic fairings are to be located to avoid posing a safety hazard in rear underride crashes.

Rear underride crashes are those in which the front end of a vehicle impacts the rear of a generally larger vehicle, and slides under the rear-impacted vehicle. Underride may occur to some extent in collisions in which a small passenger vehicle crashes into the rear end of a large trailer or semi-trailer because the bed and chassis of the impacted vehicle is higher than the hood of the passenger vehicle. In excessive underride crashes, there is “passenger compartment intrusion” (PCI) as the passenger vehicle underrides so far that the rear end of the struck vehicle collides with and enters the passenger compartment of the striking passenger vehicle. PCI can result in severe injuries and fatalities to occupants contacting the rear end of the struck vehicle. An underride guard prevents PCI when it engages the striking end of the smaller vehicle and stops the vehicle from sliding too far under the struck vehicle’s bed and chassis.

The occupant crash protection features built into today’s passenger vehicles are able to provide high levels of occupant protection in 56 km/h (35 mph) frontal crashes. (1) If guards were made stronger to remain in place and prevent PCI in crashes of severities of up to 56 km/h (35 mph), the impacting vehicle’s occupant protection technologies could absorb enough of the crash forces resulting from the impact to significantly reduce the risk of fatality and serious injury to the occupants of the colliding vehicle.

Link: http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=NHTSA_FRDOC_0001-1548